Starting a new print- Emily Orzech

Yesterday I started working on the first print of the summer. It is always hard to dive back into old work, and it feels like my ideas need to shift in response to Covid. I often begin with self-portraits as a way to revisit memories. With social distancing, this is the only way to incorporate figures in my work.

transparencies for new screenprint

Whenever I start a print, I create a lot of quick compositional “sketches” in Photoshop. The final version of the print may only include a few of these elements. I am starting to lay out some of the transparencies I think I might use for the project. Like earlier work in the series, I am beginning with a memory from before the pandemic. However, I chose this one because it comes to mind so sharply when I read the news.

example of a photo layer turned into a halftone for screenprinting

3 thoughts on “Starting a new print- Emily Orzech

  1. Dear Emily,
    Thank you for the storytelling! Such a good dog!
    This is a nice example how does the artist work reacting on a great incident.

    If I understand correctly, the original images (fragments of the subsequent “handmade” graphic screenprint) are mostly digital, right?
    How many prints do you usually make from a single template (if this question is correct from a technological point of view)?

    It would be interesting to see both the result and other stages of your work!

    1. Great questions! Yes. The original images begin as digital files. I transform photographs into halftones (dots) on photoshop. They are then printed out on a transparent film and exposed onto a screen. I can then print the image onto paper, on in this case panel. A lot of these are non-editioned, so I am only making one final piece. However, screenprint would normally be editioned. I will often do 10 because the process of layering and sanding that I am using is really labor intensive. However, the stencils on the screen will hold up to hundreds of copies being made.

What do you think about this?