Numbers and How Your Lights Dancing, Nena Nastasiya

April, day 22nd 2020. A hello from a warm morning with 15°C touch of sun and a moderate 29km/h breeze from the east-northeast.

It was warm and quite windy before I made my lunch on that Monday, the 20th days of April. I started recording an unplanned video using natural dappled light. I can say that this is quite unplanned because I never set up a position or time or how it should be looks like in a frame. It was also a spontaneous recording by putting the Space Robot series into whatever and however, the dappled lights come up during the time I am working on other things in my studio.

27th April 2020, 11:15 am, 15°C, 10 km/h southwest

I found that the production was quite fun and organic day by day until I realized that this little dancing lights are completely changing interestingly by how the weather shaped it. There were several afternoons I have spent by looking at the weather history site and making notes from that. It just feels so close to your works and nature which happened next to you.

19th May 2020, 11:48 am, 19°C, 11 km/h west
25th May 2020, 10:40 am, 17°C, 12 km/h north-northwest

Summer already began the time I completed all the dancing lights. It was Tuesday morning after 10 am. A soft wind came from the south-southeast with 4 degrees Celsius warmer from when I started working with the dancing lights a month before. I see that it somehow a bit disappear as the days become warmer and warmer with less wind. Inviting people to catch the sun until it comes back again next year, in a windy warm Spring days with so many weathers on it.




2 thoughts on “Numbers and How Your Lights Dancing, Nena Nastasiya

  1. Hi, Nena! Nice to see more of the Space Robot. Natural light is truly fascinating — dancing, slipping away, playing, impossible to capture. When I was a student, one of our professors at the art academy regularly took us to the Hermitage museum to look at etchings by Rembrandt. The windows in that hall were always covered with thick curtains, because sunlight is harmful for works on paper. He always went over to the museum custodians and asked them to pull up the curtains. When the light came in those graphics really transformed, they looked completely different with natural light. It was a very exciting moment. Sunlight is mostly unwelcome in exhibition spaces as something you can’t control. But I absolutely love natural light on artworks. It creates a new visual layer.

    1. Hey hey Anastasia!

      I can imagine that and so relatable! I had quite a sunny studio during my residency in Tokyo and a bit afraid to put my works on the wall that really got a direct strong sunlight every day. But in the end, it always lovely to see the works takes into account elements in the real world seemingly affecting the visual.

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