Facade by Yumiko Ono

 

I would like to share a work that I showed before COVID-19 and completed during COVID19. This pair of paper objects “Facade” is shown as a part of my solo exhibition “Epitomes” at MOCA Taipei from December 2019 until February 2020. After the exhibition ended, I burnt the objects in a temple following the Taiwanese tradition of Zhizha.

I had an opportunity to do a residency at Taipei Artist Village before this exhibition and I first started to research Taiwanese tradition as well as architecture. While researching, I became interested in Taiwanese tradition Zhizha, which refers to houses and daily objects made out of paper that are made for the deceased in the afterlife. I found a connection between Zhizha and my imaginary architectural work, as they both have realistic appearances without practical purposes. In this exhibition, I showed objects comprised of several facades that are a hybrid form of Taiwan’s architecture made through my collaboration with a Taipei-based Zhizha company. I used Taiwanese architectural elements from various time periods to create pseudo architectural objects, which seem familiar but do not exist in reality. Unlike conventional Zhizha, I decided to eliminate colors and have only facades without the “inside” to emphasize the surface nature as I created the rest of the works in the exhibition also with surfaces such as slip-cast porcelain and drawings that are covered with various images of surfaces.

       

 

Yumiko Ono

website : https://www.yumikoono.com/

instagram : yumikoo.oono

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Facade by Yumiko Ono

  1. Yumiko ..I love this..the idea..the art pieces ..the ephemeralness. When I was in China I was making paper clothes and was told about the tradition of the paper clothes/objects for the after life..It adds another level of consciousness, I think. Did you use holds to make the architecture?
    Thank you

  2. Dear Yumiko-san,
    beautiful works and the burning of this piece is very impressive. Also the connection between the Taiwanese tradition Zhizha, the Taiwanese architectural fronts and the deceased loved ones, who need these things in their afterlife is pure and beautiful.

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